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of a foreign service officer. learning about foreign-policy around the dinner table each night to this service in combat -- his service in combat in vietnam. less well known is the story of this foreign policy work inside dissonant. -- the senate. his 90 overseas trips that he made in 28 years on foreign relations committee, his work to ensure free elections in the philippines, his work with aids in africa, his work as chairman of the new start treaty and his very public and successful diplomatic intervention in afghanistan, pakistan, and sudan. historians will judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to
or incorrect when you say it -- when you said that the search would be the most dangerous foreign-policy disaster sense the non? the question is right or wrong. i would like the answer of whether you are right or wrong and then you are free to elaborate. >> i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer. >> let the record show that you refused to answer the question. >> if you would like me to explain, -- >> i actually would like an answer. >> what else did we learn from today's hearing a short time ago? he did not do the best job of defending himself. >> no, it was a fractious hearing and pointless. he referred to the government of iran as legitimately elected. he apologized for saying that israel had arranged a slaughter of its enemies. he was defending his views on iran. on israel, they think he is not friendly enough. in the end, i don't think we learned a lot about him, really. in the past, he had expressed traditionally dovish liberal foreign policy positions even though he used to be a republican. he was moving back from those same more of what the republican senators wanted to hear
. >> that's only if you think 80,000 people dead is not ugly. yes, sir. adding a mac >> foreign-policy and especially security systems. this is another area where congress really has a role to play. the administration is basically decided that mohamed morsi at egypt is the new mubarak. the guy in the seat we will now help. it's completely indifferent to what our aid program should look like and what the desired outcome and egypt should be. the only thing they appear to be interested in is the continuation of the israeli egyptian camp david accords, which are obviously of great interest, but not really the only thing they should animate us and we talk about the largest country in the middle east. when i thought we were delivering fighter jets to the egyptian military, i just asked myself, what message does this send? the rule should be not the foreign aid is bad and not that foreign aid is good and not that military assistance is good or bad, it is the u.s. taxpayer dollar used to further u.s. tax your interest and every time a new government comes into power, we should take that aid do
on this complex issue. robert kagn is a center fellow of the united states and european foreign policy of the brookings institution. his most recent book "the world america made" has been published and dr. kagan also serves as a member of secretary clinton's foreign policy board soon to be senator kerry's policy board and writes a monthly column on a world affairs from "the washington post" and the weekly standard and the new republic. joshua landis is the director of the center for middle east studies and this is the professor at the university of oklahoma. he writes a daily newsletter on syrian policy that attract some 200,000 pages a month. is really one of the most thoughtful blogs today on a which really dives into the crisis and syria. current the vice president for the new initiatives and the distinguished scholar at the woodrow wilson institute at national center for scholars in washington, d.c. they can have another great president. for nearly to nearly two decades has served the secretaries of state and advisers in the middle east bureau, negotiating middle east peace which w
on the jihadization for a policy under obama? i said, ma'am, with all due respect, president obama's foreign policy is an extension of president bush's foreign policy. if there's any difference at all, president obama is killing more people overseas than president bush ever did. so, no, i don't think there's any difference between the bush foreign policy and the obama foreign policy, which i think is a shame. there was a wonderful opportunity to take a different path and to reclaim our position as a moral leader in the world. i am disappointed in that. with regard to john brennan, i've known him since 1990. i worked directly for john brennan twice. i think he is a terrible choice to lead the cia. i think it is time for the cia to move beyond the ugliness of the post-september 11 regime, and we need someone who is going to respect the constitution and not be bogged down by a legacy of torture. i think president obama's upon of john brennan sends the message to all americans. >> you worked with him, directly for him. did he receive internal updates regularly about the torture techniques including wat
has made haiti one of the top foreign policy projects, helping the impoverished island build back better after the devastating earthquake that killed over a quarter million people. in no small measure has her husband -- president clinton -- been a part of that attempt at restoration of haiti from that devastating earthquake. last week during secretary clinton's final appearance before the senate foreign relations committee, she said -- and i quote -- "every time that blue and white airplane carrying the words "united states of america" touches down in some far-off capital, i feel again the honor it is to represent the world's indispensable nation. madam secretary, you have truly honored us with your indispensable leadership. and on behalf of all of our senate colleagues, we want to thank you for your extraordinary service to this country. and i want to say that your position will be in capable hands with our colleague and your former colleague, senator john kerry, who will serve as we confirm him in the next 24 hours as the 68th secretary of state. senator kerry has served in this
think this speech given last night by this president represents the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since the vietnam. if it is carried out, i will resist it." the question continued on for months and months talking about what a disaster the surge would be even when it was clear the surge was succeeding. in march 2008, you said "the term quagmires could apply. some reject that term, but if that is not a quagmire, what is? even as late as august 29, 2011, in an interview with the "financial times" -- you said i disagree with president obama and his decision to surge in iraq as i did with president obama. do you stand by those comments? >> senator, i stand by them because i made them. >> were you right? where you write in your assessment? >> i would defer to the judgment of history to assert -- to sort that out. >> the committee deserves to know whether you are right or wrong about the search. >> i will explain why -- >> i want to know if you are right or wrong. it's a direct question. >> the surge assisted in the objective. >> will you please answer the questi
with cutbacks to the u.s. stockpile as a means to draw russia into negotiations, foreign policy magazine reported, ahead of the unannounced discussions. the house subcommittee chairman mike rogers asks if they have assurances as to what is going on there. i would note that last year's defense authorization villepin -- bill calls for briefings on his discussions to the congress, the servant -- the armed services committee and subcommittee. it does not less than twice each year, the president or his designee will brief the committee on foreign relations and the committee on armed services about the dialogue between the u.s. and the russian federation on issues of limits or controls of nuclear arms, missile defense system, and long-range conventional strike systems. the deadline for that would be march 2 this year. my first question to you, if confirmed, will you honor that request as part of the mdaa? >> the request for the briefing? >> yes, the requirements for the briefing. will you keep congress advise on any discussions dealing with national defense and dialogue with russia on national
with the mainstream of u.s. foreign and defense policy and also with president obama. chuck hagel believes we must preserve the american strength as a force for good in the world. he recognizing that protecting our interests requires strong allies and friends, as well as strong american leadership. third, chuck has the depth of experience and leadership skills required to handle this tough job. there is no shortage of security challenges around the world, as this committee knows and as you enumerated this morning, mr. chairman. a very large and impressive group of former cabinet officials and public servants from both sides of the aisle have said that they trust chuck hagel with this important responsibility. and i strongly, i strongly agree. fourth, on the fiscal side, i am will be athat chauck powerful advocate for a common- sense approach in this administration and on capitol hill regarding fiscal challenges to the defense budget. he understands that our defense capabilities are being threatened on two budget friends. first, sequestration, with its damaging, across the board, up from the budget
may approach foreign policy and national security in his second term. and in a little less than an hour and a half, a cato institute forum on the state of libertarianism. >> several live events to tell you about today. the georgetown university law center hosts a forum with campaign staff members and representatives of interest groups who will focus on how lessons of last year's campaign will affect legislation in the new congress. that's on c-span at 11 a.m. eastern. and here on c-span2 at 1 p.m., we're covering an atlantic council discussion on the situation in mali. >> john mccain's 2000 campaign when he ran for president is the most memorable campaign. i mean, of any that i've ever covered or been around. i mean, it was just -- we'll never, we'll never see it again. i mean, here he was, you know, facing george w. bush who had all the face cards of the republican party backing him, and the three republican governors in new hampshire and all the money, and john mccain went out and held 114 town meetings, and he stayed there until every or question was answered. and you'd see p
this militarization of u.s. foreign policy and, you know, is africom really just a guise to allow the u.s. military an entree into africa, and is that really what you're, you you know, what you're about there, is to get a presence on the continent? let me just say from a, just from a scale the state department and usaid is the principal entity of the government that spends money, spends last fiscal year between eight and nine billion, billion with a b, in africa. the department of defense spent a little more than $500 million. so there's a, i mean, there's just a dollar comparison in terms of what the level of effort is. overwhelmingly, the u.s. government's support to african countries falls into the categories of health care, education and agriculture. security is a very, very minor part of it. it's an important part, but it's a minor part of the u.s. overallen gaugement with african -- overall engagement with african countries, and i think that's probably as it should be. the defense strategic guidance which i referred to in my opening comments tells me from the president and the secretary of de
of a foreign-policy think tank. at his confirmation hearing today, he had some back and forth with former colleagues, including senator john mccain. that exchange is about an hour and a half into the hearing. later, we will get your thoughts about the nomination and hearing on our phone lines at 11:00 p.m. eastern, 8:00 pacific. carl levin chairs the armed services committee and makes the opening statement. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> good morning, everybody. the committee meets today to consider the nomination of former senator chuck hagel to be secretary of defense. before i begin, i want to first welcome senator inhofe as the new ranking republican on our committee, succeeding senator mccain. senator mccain has been a great partner over the past six years, and i thank him for all the work he has done to get bills enacted, his leadership on a host of issues, his support for the work of this committee, and for always keeping our hearings likely. -- lively. senator inhofe has shown his strong commitmen
of the foreign-policy choices facing this country. and today we are continuing what we have come to call secretary of state week here in the council. on tuesday night we were fortunate to hear from george shultz, who served as secretary of state for some six and a half years under president ronald reagan. and this afternoon we are honored to host hillary rodham clinton. during her last 24 hours as president obama's first president obama's first secretary of state and immediately afterwards and told she might be expected to party like it's cartagena all over again. [laughter] we did a research and this is the eighth time that hillary clinton has spoken at the council and her third appearance in and her current incarnation as secretary of state. this afternoon speech is probably the most anticipated one she has given here and indeed it may be the most anticipated farewell address since 1796. [laughter] i suspect though that her views on untangling alliances might be somewhat different than george washington's. much has been made of the mile she has put in as the country's 67 secretary of s
the understanding of the world of the foreign policy choices facing this country. today we are continuing what we have come to call secretary of state we cure the council. on tuesday night we were fortunate to hear from george shultz, who served as secretary of state for some six and a half years under president ronald reagan. and this afternoon we are honored to host hillary rodham clinton. during her last 24 hours as president obama's for secretary of state, immediately afterwards i'm told she might be expected to party like it's cartagena all over again. [laughter] we did our research and this is the eighth time that hillary clinton has spoken at the council and her third appearance in her current incarnation as secretary of state. and his afternoon speech is probably the most anticipated one she has given here and it may be the most anticipated farewell address since 1796. [laughter] i suspect though that her views on entangling alliances might be somewhat different than george washington's. much as been made of the mile she has put in as the country 67 secretary of state. you have seen a sta
is very good in foreign policy and i think she will be -- i think this will help her in 2016. host: we go next to jeff in tupelo, mississippi. republican line. caller: good morning. how are you? host: fine, thank you. caller: she got sworn in, she looked good in the pictures, she flew around the world a little bit, and nothing that she has accomplished. i don't think our allies are real pleased with. our enemies in the past belief in the best predictor of -- i mean, future behavior is past behavior. the only thing that the real bad people in this world understand is force. i don't think talking to them and making nice-nice with them is going to do anything except emboldened them. host: you made a statement about our allies and their perception? could you expand on that? caller: well, the lead from behind strategy of this administration got two diplomats killed and three brave americans killed in libya. as far as her taking responsibility for that, what responsibility is it that she has actually taken? none she actually said to the american people what difference does it make now for that
states foreign policy tries to dictate terms to places like bolivia, less than 1% of excess cocaine in bolivia with ends up in the united states. and yet the heavyhanded nature of u.s. policy, you would think this was some kind of flood coming from bolivia the way we dictate terms to that country. and so, now, imagine if the united nations and the audience of the u.n. convention were to treat coffee the way, with the contempt they treat coca, right? what would happen if they -- and they've told bolivians and peruvians you have to stop chewing coca which they've been doing for centuries, if not thousands of years. imagine if they did that to the united states, you know, coffee, you have to give up this habit now. what would happen? well, a friend of mine actually did this. he was a performance art major, andrew. he went to amherst college, and in 2001 he conspire with the the school administration and student government to secretly ban coffee or for one day without notice during finals week as a performance art project. so all these students get up in the morning, and there's no coff
when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect, yes or no? >> my reference to the surge being the most dangerous. >> are you going to answer the question, senator hagel? the question is were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. i would like an answer on whether you were right or wrong, then you're free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer on a lot of things. >> well let the record show that you refused to answer the question. now please go ahead. >> well, if you'd like me to explain why ... >> i'd actually like an answer, yes or no? >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no. i think it's far more complicated than that, as i've already said. my answer is i'll defer that judgment to history. as to the comment i made about >> i think history has already made a judgment about the surge, sir, and you're on the wrong side of it. and your refusal to answer whether you were right or wrong about it is going to have an impact on my judgment a
policymaker are. that will be an issue if she runs in 2016. jon: he drives foreign policy. >> there is no question about that. there is no question about that. everybody concedes that and her allies concede it inside the administration. this is president obama's show and a she has been a spokesman an implementer of that policy. jon: paul gigot, from "the wall street journal". >> thanks, jon. jon: he will look at the week's top stories the "journal editorial report" airs tomorrow at 2:00 are eastern on the fox news channel. jenna: a massive deadly pileup yesterday on a michigan freeway. harris faulkner has the latest from the breaking news desk. >> reporter: the pictures from yesterday are simply eye-popping, a chain-reaction crash that left cars twisted and slipped more than a mile along interstate 75. this is detroit. we're learning more about what drivers were doing to try to stay alive during this. many slamming on their brakes. others swerving to avoid all the cars that were immediately piling up. that navy saved some lives we're told. still, three people died. among t
union. but a lot of people in the washington foreign policy establishment both republicans, and democrats, think that's impossible. that if you want to deal from an iran or from a north korea you have to not raise these unpleasant issues but, you know, frankly i think it is to the benefit of u.s. security to do it. now going forward i would it is unlikely. this is an administration here in the united states especially with john kerry becoming secretary of state, chuck hagel, secretary of defense and sham elections coming in iran in june, this is an administration that is going to want to engage again in negotiations, think they can get the deal of the century. so unfortunately i think the trend in washington is against i can making a bigger issue of this but i think that is unfortunate. martha: if i were the pastor's wife listening to you it would be hard to be hopeful. what do you think the outcome will be here? >> well, you know, there is at least a trend in iran of fewer executions. there is an instance of people not serving their full terms and being let out. but it may
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)